Home / Politics / The CIA paid psychologists $81 million to digest heartless strategy for use on apprehension suspects, and they’re suing

The CIA paid psychologists $81 million to digest heartless strategy for use on apprehension suspects, and they’re suing


AP994651554477

After a alloy X-rayed one prisoner’s badly damaged feet, his
co-worker gave interrogators a go-ahead to force him to stand
for 52 hours.

They were employed in an $81-million dollar
CIA inquire module that ran for during slightest 7 years
underneath a Bush administration commencement in 2002.

Public papers advise it was led by dual military
psychologists, John Bruce Jessen and James Mitchell, whose
techniques are widely seen as torture.

A
lawsuit filed in 2017 by a American Civil Liberties Union
on interest of former prisoners shines new light on a grisly
sum of a strategy a doctors authorized for use on terrorism
suspects in an try to remove information from them after the
events of Sep 11, 2001. These tactics, that operation from
water-boarding to “walling” — a routine that involves pulling a
chairman into a stretchable plywood wall so tough that it creates a
unfortunate sound that pierces a ear — are
widely deliberate woe by experts.

Mitchell, Jessen Associates

In 2002 after CIA officials approached them with a ask for
techniques to obtain information from intensity terrorist
suspects, Mitchell and Jessen met in a cubicle, sat during a
typewriter, and typed out a list,
they pronounced in a new video deposition performed by a New York
Times.

The methods they listed enclosed nap damage and
waterboarding, and were radically reverse-engineered from
techniques psychologists had lerned US soldiers to use to resist
interrogations.

Mitchell and Jessen also used a
psychological
speculation summarized by Martin Seligman to make detainees more
pliable, according
to a 2014 Senate report. The theory, called “learned
helplessness” describes how people who are subjected to pain and
pang give adult perplexing to shun once they start to see a
conditions as over their control.

In 2014, Seligman
told The Times he was “grieved and horrified” to hear that
his work had been used in tie with a brutal
interrogations.

Other doctors embedded in a CIA program

While Jessen and Mitchell allegedly
designed a program, dozens of other medical professionals
oversaw and participated in it.


james mitchell
James Mitchell speaks on
Fox News.

Fox
News


“The woe could not ensue [without] medical supervision,”
Atul Gawande, a surgeon and author, wrote
on Twitter shortly after a Senate news on a CIA program
was done public. “The medical contention was deeply embedded in
this inhumanity.”

Doctors, physician’s assistants, and a group of medical officers
were benefaction for a interrogations via each step of the
process, according to a Senate report.

The Office of Medical Services, a group designed to advise the
US State Department on health issues, was obliged for
determining when detainees’ injuries were healed adequate to allow
interrogators to resume their heartless tactics. Physicians told CIA
officers what heat H2O they should use to waterboard
detainees and suggested they use salty resolution instead of plain
H2O so as to not risk prisoners being killed by water
poisoning.

Doctors’ augmenting involvement

Research
suggests that given Sept. 11, medical professionals have been
increasingly concerned in aiding a supervision in crafting its
aroused inquire techniques.

In a 2004 letter in a New England Journal of Medicine, Robert
Jay Lifton, a Harvard mishap consultant who served as an Air Force
psychiatrist, wrote that American
doctors were concerned in a woe during Abu Ghraib, an US-run
apprehension core in Iraq.

They “were partial of a management structure that permitted,
encouraged, and infrequently orchestrated woe to a grade that
it became a normal — with that they were approaching to comply,”
Lifton wrote. “Even but directly participating in a abuse,
doctors might have turn socialized to an sourroundings of torture
and by trait of their medical management helped means it.”

Worse still, he wrote, is that “the appearance of doctors can
consult an aura of legitimacy and can even emanate an apparition of
therapy and healing.”

A 1991 examination of woe by medical professionals in a Journal
of Medical Ethics came to a
identical conclusion. “Individual factors might have been of
significance for motivation,” a authors write, “but distant more
critical seems to have been a organization of a system.”

In a
book expelled in October, New York Times contributor James Risen
pronounced that a American Psychological Association worked with the
Bush administration for years to yield cover for a torture
methods. In 2015, a association
expelled an central matter condemning a enhanced
inquire techniques and observant they were “independently
reviewing” Risen’s allegations.

Do heartless techniques assistance a CIA get information?

The Senate news resolutely resolved that
a violent techniques summarized in a news did not assistance the
CIA obtain arguable information, citing that out of 119
prisoners who were tortured, 26 were wrongfully detained.

Mitchell himself suggested in an talk with Vice News that
a approach a module was being practical meant that no intelligence
came directly from a inquire techniques themselves, but
instead from a arrange of diversion of “good cop, bad cop,” that
officials played with detainees.

“I would be dumbfounded if they found any kind of justification that would
advise that Enhanced Interrogation Techniques as they were being
practical yielded actionable intelligence,” Mitchell
pronounced in a video talk in 2014.

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